Marlowe-Shakespeare
Society
The International
Oxford

Doubts about Shakespeare focus on
biographical inconsistencies. There is
no evidence he went to school,
traveled, learned foreign languages, or
spent time in an aristocratic milieu.
The Oxfordian theory proposes to
solve these problems since Edward
DeVere possessed all of the
educational and social attributes that
are on display in the works of
Shakespeare.
The Earl of Oxford
Problems with the Oxford case

The Earl of Oxford's supporters are on a bit of a roll recently. They have the support of legendary
Shakespearean actor Derek Jacobi, and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stevens ––no intellectual
lightweight––has publicly stated his support of the Oxfordian claim.

The circumstantial case for Oxford is impressive. Influential people and exotic places mentioned in
the Shakespeare plays have connections to DeVere. True, but any evidence that he could write
Shakespearean verse is notably missing. Strangely, there is
a body of surviving poetry attributed to
Oxford––it's just not very good. It sounds nothing like the voice of the writer Shakespeare.

One of the proofs of the Oxford claim is the mention by Francis Meres in 1598 that the Earl of
Oxford was "one of our best for Comedies." One would assume from Meres's list that awareness
that Oxford wrote plays was common at the time. He evidently did not mind it known that he was a
poet and a playwright. So what then was the supposed motivation for hiding behind the front of the
theater company share-holder William Shakespeare? Why allow mediocre poetry to circulate in his
name, and then withhold his name from poetry of infinitely greater quality?

Unlike
Christopher Marlowe, there is no evidence that Oxford could write verse of the quality found
in the works of Shakespeare.
More about Oxford

MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009
Not Oxford Either!
By Isabel Gortázar

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2009
Questions All Oxfordians Must Answer
By Peter Farey

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009
Oxfordians and the 1604 question
By Peter Farey

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2009
The Wrong Candidate?
By Peter Farey

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2008
On de Vere:
A question for Daryl Pinksen, author of Marlowe's Ghost

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2008
On de Vere:
A question for Samuel Blumenfeld, author of The Marlowe-Shakespeare Connection
The major candidates - Shakespeare, Oxford, Bacon, Marlowe